New Year, New Direction

I started this blog for a couple of reasons. I felt I needed something where I could share my thoughts, but not with so much depth as The Grove of Quotes. Also it was made to accompany me through my work through OBOD‘s Druid grade (third and final grade that I started a little over two years ago). Now I’m coming to the end of the course I can reflect a little on where this blog has been and where it will go.

This blog has helped me express some thoughts I encountered in the course, sharing ideas on learning and creating languages, sharing other creative endeavours such as art and stories, and so on. And I shall carry on, but my focus will be changing. The course is ending, but the process of becoming a Druid is just starting. I have aquired the tools, now it’s the time to apply them in my life. For that reason “druid in training” is still apt.

In the new year I’ll be starting a course in Ecopsychology (Mika has just finished it) and we’ll be do more activities combining art with ecopsychological insight (Ecoart workshops). We’ll also be working with CEN (as mentioned in a previous post) and continuing our development of a sustainable ecological project, and so taking my druidry into action.

Happy New Year!

Conlangs…

… or constructed languages.

In an earlier blog I mentioned I have the Language Construction Kit and was creating a language, and I’ve been doing stuff with it.

Well make that two languages. There is Alahithian (alahitiano in Spanish and Alahitien in French), and now there is Gnoughish. There a third without a name that I’ve experimented with a bit, but want to concentrate on Alahithian and Gnoughish.

Alahithian looks quite foreign with a spelling system unlike West European languages, whereas Gnoughish I’ve made by copying any Modern English with Old English roots, though with a made-up vocabulary. A lot of the grammar, such as word order, is the same, at least until I’ve experimented a bit more with it.

Boror bik alahep alahith* – this language is Alahithian (lit. This tongue is called Alahithian, and word for word it’s: (to) call this tongue Alahithian)

Chin frold eampt Gnoughish – this language (lit. speech) is Gnoughish.

*notice the similarity between alahep (tongue) and alahith (Alahithian), which both share the same root.

Here’s an example of a poem of mine written in the Alahithian script, sebus (lit. writing):

Oh dear…

I have in my hand The Language Construction Kit by Mark Rosenfelder, and already I have figured out a few basic rules to my language. I could get carried away with this.

I’ve created the personal pronouns, and started on other pronouns, I’ve created forms for verbs and nouns, and created a few of each (mostly verbs), I have tenses (though still trying to work out verb aspects), a negative suffix, singular and plural, and I’ve still got to get my head around all the grammatical terms! How many times do I have to look up the term “aspects”???

Om alahirtel alahith, omon erefiwt. – I do not speak Alahithian, I am learning it. (I’d say “creating it” but haven’t invented that word yet…)

In Alahithian it is know as alahith, which also means “the speech” and is derived from the verb alahir, “to speak”. Language is alahish and languages, alahizh.

For a phonetic reference see dhê nyoo alfêbet (and yes, I’ve even created my own alphabet for this language LOL): http://jakefishoutofwater.wordpress.com/nyoo-alfebet/

And then there’s The Planet Construction Kit by the same author… Om onedoy thefiw (I’m going to think).